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Monday, April 20, 2020 | History

2 edition of Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, 1941-1964 found in the catalog.

Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, 1941-1964

Mordechai Altshuler

Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, 1941-1964

  • 179 Want to read
  • 36 Currently reading

Published by Brandeis University Press in Waltham, Mass .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Identity,
  • Government policy,
  • Jews,
  • Social conditions,
  • Ethnic relations,
  • History

  • Edition Notes

    Includes bibliographical references and index.

    StatementMordechai Altshuler ; translated by Saadya Sternberg
    SeriesThe Tauber Institute series for the study of European Jewry
    ContributionsSternberg, Saadya
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsDS134.85 .A4813 2012
    The Physical Object
    Paginationp. cm.
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL25215021M
    ISBN 109781611682717, 9781611682724, 9781611682731
    LC Control Number2012006310

      Robert Weinberg and Bradley Berman's carefully documented and extensively illustrated book explores the Soviet government's failed experiment to create a socialist Jewish homeland. In an area popularly known as Birobidzhan, a sparsely populated region along the Sino-Soviet border some five thousand miles east of Moscow, was designated the national homeland of Soviet Jewry. When hundreds of thousands of Jews began leaving the Soviet Union 20 years ago, American Jews looked at them the way a father beams at his children. Here was a large part of the tribe, almost lost Author: Gal Beckerman. Find many great new & used options and get the best deals for Israel and the Politics of Jewish Identity: The Secular-Religious Impasse by Asher Cohen and Bernard Susser (, Hardcover) at the best online prices at eBay! Free shipping for many products! the tauber institute series for the Study of European Jewry jehuda reinharz, General Editor sylvia fuks fried, Associate Editor eugene r. sheppard, Associate Editor The Tauber Ins.


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Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, 1941-1964 by Mordechai Altshuler Download PDF EPUB FB2

This illuminating study explores the role of religious institutions in the makeup of Jewish identity in the former Soviet Union, against the backdrop of the government’s antireligion policies from the s to the : Mordechai Altshuler.

This illuminating study explores the role of religious institutions in the makeup of Jewish identity in the former Soviet Union, against the backdrop of the government’s antireligion policies from the s to the by: 4. From religious leniency to a campaign of oppression 1. Soviet religious policy in the wake of the Nazi invasion, 2.

The legalization of congregations and synagogues 3. The formation of prayer groups (minyanim) 4. Jewish spiritual needs in the aftermath of the Holocaust 5.

Stalin's final years, persecution and the threat of liquidation 6. Public displays of Jewish identity:. nomenon as a case of a true religious revival among the Jews of the USSR, or should it be explained in terms of the special conditions of the time and new roles taken on by the religious congregations.

During the Soviet-German war and the few years afterward ( – ),Cited by: 4. Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, JavaScript is disabled for your browser.

Some features of this site may not work without it. Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, instances of Jewish public and private activities centered on synagogues and prayer groups—paradoxically the only Jewish Cited by: 4. Religion and Identity in Russia and the Soviet Union.

Focusing on the themes of religion and identity, they investigate an array of topics that reflects Bushkovitch’s own scholarly range, among them Russian Orthodoxy's energetic adaptation to Russia’s changing domestic and international conditions; Russian self-perceptions and.

The main focus of this book is Jewish life under the Soviet regime. The themes of the book include: the attitude of the government to Jews, the fate of the Jewish religion and life in Post-World War II Russia.

The volume also contains an assessment of the prospects for future emigration.5/5(1). [2] Mordechai Altshuler, Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, – (Waltham: Brandeis University Press, ), 1.

[3] Zvi Gitelman, “Jewish Nationality and Religion,” in Religion and Nationalism in Soviet and East European Politics, ed. Sabrina P. Ramet (Durham, NC: Duke University Press, ),   The process of re-connecting Soviet Jews to their Jewish identity, begun with the Six Day War, culminated when Israel absorbed a million immigrants from the former Soviet Union.

How history shaped Jewish identity. who had sought refuge in the Soviet Union. After the war many surviving Bundists and others on the.

Books Received Books Received Altshuler, M., Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union Brandeis University Press (Waltham, ). Amanat, M., Jewish Identities in Iran: Resistance and Conversion to Islam and the Baha’I Faith.

I.B. Tauris (New York, ). Bak, S., Adam and Eve in the Art of Samuel Bak. Unearths the roots of a national awakening among Soviet Jews during World War II and its aftermath.

This illuminating study explores the role of religious institutions in the makeup of Jewish identity in the former Soviet Union, against the backdrop of the government’s antireligion policies from the s to.

Doubly Chosen Jewish Identity, the Soviet Intelligentsia, and the Russian Orthodox Church Judith Deutsch Kornblatt These time periods correspond to the decades before and after the great exodus of Jews from the Soviet Union. Judith Deutsch Kornblatt contends that the choice of baptism into the Church was an act of moral courage in the face.

Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, – Mordechai Altshuler; Saadya Sternberg, trans. Available only as an ebook. The Tauber Institute Series for the Study of European Jewry Brandeis • pp. 6 1/8 x 9 1/4" Jewish History / Russian & Soviet History / Jewish Studies $ Ebook, Note: If you're looking for a free download links of Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, (The Tauber Institute Series for the Study of European Jewry) Pdf, epub, docx and torrent then this site is not for you.

only do ebook promotions online and we does not distribute any free download of ebook on this site. Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, by Mordechai Altshuler,available at Book Depository with free delivery : Get this from a library.

Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, [Mordechai Altshuler; Saadya Sternberg]. Get this from a library. Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, [Mordechai Altshuler; Saadya Sternberg] -- Unearths the roots of a national awakening among Soviet Jews during World War II and its aftermath.

Buy Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, by Mordechai Altshuler, Saadya Sternberg from Waterstones today. Click and Collect from your local Waterstones or get FREE UK delivery on orders over £Pages: The history of the Jews in the Soviet Union is inextricably linked to much earlier expansionist policies of the Russian Empire conquering and ruling the eastern half of the European continent already before the Bolshevik Revolution of " For two centuries – wrote Zvi Gitelman – millions of Jews had lived under one entity, the Russian Empire and [its successor state] the USSR.

Jewish identity is a complex issue, akin to the question of “who is a Jew?” It has become even more complicated with aliya from the former Soviet Union countries, with at least 30 percent of Author: MARTIN VAN DEN BERGH.

Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, (book by Mordechai Altshuler and translated by Saadya Sternberg, Brandeis University Press, ) Soviet Jews in the Glasnost Era (article by in Society, May/ Vol.

28, Issue 4, pp. Judaism Without Embellishment was an anti-Semitic book published in by the Ukrainian Academy of book was written by Trofim Kichko, who worked at the Academy, who had past associations with Nazi book argued that a worldwide Jewish conspiracy existed, that the Jewish people were attempting to subvert the Soviet Union, and had played a role in the Nazi Genre: Propaganda.

A Century of Ambivalence The Jews of Russia and the Soviet Union, to the Present Second, Expanded Edition Zvi Gitelman. A richly illustrated survey of the Jewish historical experience in the Russian Empire, the Soviet Union, and the post-Soviet era.

"The phenomenon of Orthodox Christian Jews has been overlooked or ignored by investigators of Soviet and post-Soviet Jewry. As Kornblatt’s interviews reveal, however, these converts were fashioning a specifically Jewish form of identity for themselves without analogue in the West."—John D.

Klier, author of Russia Gathers Her Jews "Doubly Chosen has tremendous theological by: This is a comprehensive and topical history of the Jews in the Soviet Union and is based on firsthand documentary evidence and the application of a pioneering research method into the fate of national minorities.

Within a four-part chronological framework, Professor Pinkus examines not only the legal-political status of the Jews, and their reciprocal relationship with the Soviet majority, but. To these one should add Anna Shternshis, Soviet and Kosher: Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, ); and Mordechai Altshuler, Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union.

On the changes in the Soviet attitudes to the religion during World War II, see, for example, Mordechai Altshuler, Religion and Jewish identity in the Soviet Union, – (Waltham, Mass: Brandeis University Press, ); T.A.

Chumachenko, Gosudarstvo, pravoslavnaia tserkov’, veruiushchie – gg. (Moscow, ), pp. 23– European and American Jewish identity adopted its religious focus, leaving the realm of the national to the host country.

In the Soviet Union, the historical circumstances were different than those in Western Europe and therefore the resultant Jewish identity was different as well.

Like the Western European and American identity, the Soviet concept. As the treatment of Jews in the Soviet Union improved in the late s, U.S. immigration officials _____. which of the following is a problem endangering the identity of the Jewish family.

Which of the following terms refers to the Jewish religious yearning to return to the biblical homeland. The Russian Revolution overthrew a centuries-old regime of official antisemitism in the Russian Empire, including its Pale of Settlement.

However, the previous legacy of antisemitism was continued by the Soviet state, especially under Stalin, who spread anti-Jewish conspiracy theories through his propaganda network. Antisemitism in the Soviet Union reached new heights after during.

“The Jewish Movement in the Soviet Union is an important contribution to Soviet Jewish history, revealing new aspects of the Jewish and other dissident movements in the Soviet Union. This book will be interesting for scholars as well [as] for a wider audience interested in the Jewish experience in the USSR.”—Victoria Khiterer, The Russian.

As the treatment of Jews in the Soviet Union improved in the late s, U.S. immigration officials _____. Which of the following terms refers to the Jewish religious yearning to return to the biblical homeland.

As identified by the American Jewish Committee, which of the following is a problem endangering the identity of the Jewish. A new wave of antisemitic purges was followed by decades of disinterest in Jewish identity.

When the Soviet Union collapsed, cheap goods from across the border in. Revival of Jewish Life in the Soviet Union In the s, for the first time Jews in the Soviet Union were allowed to leave – at first a small trickle and then a strong stream. Until then, it was inconceivable that the last few remaining Jews in the Soviet Union, who cared to identify themselves as Jews, would ever escape the prison of the.

Anna Shternshis’s fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism. Jewish Popular Culture in the Soviet Union, – The book blends archival data with comments from men and women born between and in Russia and the Soviet Union and interviewed in New York Brand: Indiana University Press.

the t aUbeR institUte seRies foR the s tUdy of eURopean JewR y Jehuda Reinharz, General Editor Sylvia Fuks Fried, Associate Editor Eugene R. Sheppard, Associate Editor The Tauber.

Mordechai Altshuler, Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union,trans. Saadya Sternberg, Olga Litvak Dianne Ashton, Hanukkah in America: A History, Hizky Shoham Elissa Bemporad, Becoming Soviet Jews: The Bolshevik Experiment in Minsk, Olga LitvakAuthor: Eli Lederhendler.

An unusual opinion survey of 1, Jews in the Soviet Union has found a high degree of Jewish identity and interest in Jewish culture, even among those who oppose emigration to Israel. Jewish History / Russian & Soviet History / Jewish Studies Religion and Jewish Identity in the Soviet Union, – Unearths the roots of a national awakening among Soviet Jews during World War II and its aftermath: Altshuler, Mordechai.

A Promised Land in the U.S.S.R. Masha Gessen's book about a failed Soviet experiment asks searching questions about Jewish identity. Russian-American journalist Masha Gessen discusses the Soviet effort, into create an autonomous Jewish state in the country's far eastern region.

Gessen is. Anna Shternshis's fascinating study traces the creation of a Soviet Jewish identity that disassociated Jewishness from Judaism. The cultural transformation of Soviet Jews between and was one of the most ambitious experiments in social engineering of the past century.4/5.